Weep Not Child

Weep Not Child



Two brothers, Njoroge and Kamau, stand on a garbage heap and look into their futures: Njoroge is to attend school, while Kamau will train to be a carpenter. But this is Kenya, and the times are against them: In the forests, the Mau Mau is waging war against the white government, and the two brothers and their family need to decide where their loyalties lie. For the practical Kamau, the choice is simple, but for Njoroge the scholar, the dream of progress through learning is a hard one to give up.
First published in 1964, Weep Not, Child is a moving novel about the effects of the infamous Mau Mau uprising on the lives of ordinary men and women, and on one family in particular.
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  • ISBN:
    9780143106692
  • Book Format:
    paperback
  • Edition:
    1
  • Pages:
    176
  • Year:
    2012
Ngugi Wa Thiong'o
  • Name:
    Ngugi Wa Thiong'o
  • Gender:
    male
  • Website:
  • Biography:
    Ng?g? Wa Thiong'o (born 5 January 1938) is a Kenyan writer, formerly working in English and now working in Gikuyu. His work includes novels, plays, short stories, and essays, ranging from literary and social criticism to children's literature. He is the founder and editor of the Gikuyu-language journal M?t?iri.
    In 1977, Ng?g? embarked upon a novel form of theatre in his native Kenya. His project sought to "demystify" the theatrical process, and to avoid the "process of alienation [that] produces a gallery of active stars and an undifferentiated mass of grateful admirers" which, according to Ng?g?, encourages passivity in "ordinary people". Although Ngaahika Ndeenda was a commercial success, it was shut down by the authoritarian Kenyan regime six weeks after its opening. Ng?g? was subsequently imprisoned for over a year.
    Adopted as an Amnesty International prisoner of conscience, the artist was released from prison, and fled Kenya. In the United States, he taught at Yale University for some years, and has since also taught at New York University, with a dual professorship in Comparative Literature and Performance Studies, and the University of California, Irvine. Ng?g? has frequently been regarded as a likely candidate for the Nobel Prize in Literature.