Harvard Business School on Business and the Environment

Harvard Business School on Business and the Environment



The Harvard Business Review Paperback Series brings managers and professionals the fundamental information they need to stay competitive in a fast-moving world. Gathered in a highly accessible format are the leading minds and landmark ideas that have established the Harvard Business Review as required reading for forward-thinking business people worldwide. With concern for environmental issues growing, defining the controversial relationship between business and the environment has become even more essential. Harvard Business Review on Business and the Environment brings together the latest management thinking on the role of the environment in business, and offers a general management perspective that will help outline the critical environmental issues your organization may face. A Harvard Business Review Paperback.

  • ISBN:
    157851-233-6
  • Book Format:
    paperback
  • Edition:
    1
  • Pages:
    251
  • Year:
    2000
Harvard Business Review
  • Name:
    Harvard Business Review
  • Gender:
    male
  • Website:
  • Biography:
    Harvard Business Review (HBR) is a general management books published by Harvard Business Publishing, a wholly owned subsidiary of Harvard University. HBR's articles cover a wide range of topics that are relevant to different industries, management functions, and geographic locations. These focus on such areas as leadership, organizational change, negotiation, strategy, operations, marketing, finance, and managing people. Harvard Business Review has been the frequent publishing home for scholars and management thinkers such as Clayton M. Christensen, Peter F. Drucker, Michael E. Porter, Rosabeth Moss Kanter, John Hagel III, Thomas H. Davenport, Gary Hamel, C.K. Prahalad, Vijay Govindarajan, Robert S. Kaplan, Rita Gunther McGrath and others. Management concepts and business terms such as Balanced scorecard, Core competence, Strategic intent, Reengineering, Globalization, Marketing myopia, and Glass ceiling were all first given prominence in HBR.