Harvard Business School on Effective Communication

Harvard Business School on Effective Communication



With topics that include how to run a successful meeting, change frontline employees' behavior, and build effective management teams, this indispensable volume offers useful tips for all businesspeople. The Harvard Business Review Paperback Series is designed to bring today's managers and professionals the fundamental information they need to stay competitive in a fast-moving world. Here are the landmark ideas that have established the Harvard Business Review as required reading for ambitious business people in organizations around the globe. Articles include: Listening to People by Ralph G. Nichols and Leonard A. Stevens; How to Run a Meeting by Anthony Jay; Creative Meetings Through Power Sharing by George M. Prince; Nobody Trusts the Boss Completely--Now What? by Fernando Bartolome; Skilled Incompetence by Chris Argyris; The Hidden Messages Managers Send by Michael B. McCaskey; Reaching and Changing Frontline Employees by T.J. Larkin and Sandar Larkin; and How Management Teams Can Have a Good Fight by Kathleen M. Eisenhardt, Jean L. Kahwajy, and L.J. Bourgeois, III.

  • ISBN:
    1-57851-143-7
  • Book Format:
    paperback
  • Edition:
    1
  • Pages:
    209
  • Year:
    1999
Harvard Business Review
  • Name:
    Harvard Business Review
  • Gender:
    male
  • Website:
  • Biography:
    Harvard Business Review (HBR) is a general management books published by Harvard Business Publishing, a wholly owned subsidiary of Harvard University. HBR's articles cover a wide range of topics that are relevant to different industries, management functions, and geographic locations. These focus on such areas as leadership, organizational change, negotiation, strategy, operations, marketing, finance, and managing people. Harvard Business Review has been the frequent publishing home for scholars and management thinkers such as Clayton M. Christensen, Peter F. Drucker, Michael E. Porter, Rosabeth Moss Kanter, John Hagel III, Thomas H. Davenport, Gary Hamel, C.K. Prahalad, Vijay Govindarajan, Robert S. Kaplan, Rita Gunther McGrath and others. Management concepts and business terms such as Balanced scorecard, Core competence, Strategic intent, Reengineering, Globalization, Marketing myopia, and Glass ceiling were all first given prominence in HBR.